Still the funniest review I’ve read this year. Please read it and share your thoughts with me, I would love to see what all my Goodreads friends think of this book :), (#gifted @thebookerprizes) Okay so. It owes its success to a delicious chocolate recipe, passed down the generations with great solemnity and caution. Some clues indicate that Kostya’s friend Georgi Alani, a Soviet attache in London tasked with “repatriating” fugitives, may be Little Big Man’s illegitimate son. Henry was born on June 28, 1491, the second son of Henry VII, the first English ruler from the House of Tudor. November 14th 2019 Want a lesson in endurance? Some of those dark deaths, I threw a party over. A few would have gutted me if they had come to pass. Ever since reading the novel “Soviet Milk” and finding out more about the Latvian strand of my family history I’ve been interested in the effects the Soviet Union had upon Eastern European countries. His henchman Lavrenti Beria – also Georgian – does appear, as a short man with pince-nez known only as Little Big Man. And this fear was all too present while reading this book. Set over more than a hundred years in Georgia, we follow six generations of the Jashi family. I just really like this book – as you may have noticed. But the size of the book in total...oh well. Accept my eight. Nino Haratischvili’s characters…come to exuberant life. Yes, even people who dislike reading that sort of book, because educate yourself. I am giving my eight to you. Her huge novel … shows a double face, its crushing pain and loss nonetheless conveyed … Yet used as a chapter epigraph towards the end of Nino Haratischvili’s harrowing, heartening and utterly engrossing epic novel, Steinbeck’s words are freighted with irony. If it’s not my all-time favourite novel (and it might be) then it must be in the top three or four. The Eighth Life (For Brilka), by Nino Haratischvili, translated by Charlotte Collins and Ruth Martin, Scribe, RRP£20, 944 pages. Your turn, Brilka. Free UK p&p over £15. Arranged in eight “books”, the “beautiful puzzle” of family history begins with Niza’s great-great-grandfather, a master chocolatier. Truly epic and utterly absorbing, The Eighth Life is a novel of seven exceptional lives lived under the heat and light of empire, revolution, war, repression, and liberation. The Eighth Life book. It i s sure to be an instant classic. I just love this book so much! Several characters crave Vienna as fervently as Chekhov’s Three Sisters pine for Moscow – a longing that (like the chocolatier’s confections) embodies the European dreams Georgia shelved during 70 years of Soviet rule. Maybe sincerity is underpriced asset in modern fiction. I was often crying, for seemingly no reason whatsoever - except I do think there is one after all. I’m going to need you all to put aside any qualms you might have about its 930 pages and just DIVE RIGHT IN to this beautiful, multigenerational family saga, history of 20th century Georgia, with a cursed hot chocolate recipe to boot! Firstly, she tells the stories (lots of stories) about an extended family, over several generations, including the various people associated with them, mainly friends and/or lovers. The Eighth Life But she was wrong. But everything else was amazing! The Eighth Life is an unforgettable love letter to Georgia and the Caucasus, to lives led and to come, and to writing itself.' You learn so much about the history of the USSR and Georgia as a country and its part in it, but it's not only that. It is a sad story, a very melancholic one. At over 930 pages, “The Eighth Life” may look intimidating from the outside and I had a few false starts reading this novel but as soon as I got caught up in the many stories it contains I stopped noticing what page number I was on. Right now I have a very hard time of being objective, a harder one than usual! The Goldfinch could actually learn a lot from it! of my friends has read or even put it on their reading list? It makes for an engrossing book. Far from omniscient, Niza’s narrative is an imaginative feat to set against the historical gaps and silences left by state propaganda and trauma, in “a century that cheated and deceived everyone”. It is being translated into many languages, and has already been a major bestseller on publication in Holland, Poland, and Georgia. And it's a GREAT icebreaker for people to talk to you! It is being translated into many languages, and has already been a major bestseller on publication in Holland, Poland, and Georgi. 😭, [Slight update] I don't tend to do this, but I wrote a longer review for Asymptote, and if you are interested you can find it. Forget pepper spray, forget self-defense courses, all you need is this brick of a book and you're set). I mean, it is very nice to read it font-wise and everything. Now winner of the Warwick Prize for Women in Translation. Patterns in the blood-red rug leap out at the reader long after this momentous book is closed. Henry VIII: Early Life . The Eighth Life was originally published in German in 2014 and won the 2018 Bertolt Brecht prize. I still have nightmares every night. The Eighth Life, an ‘epic tale of six generations of one family’, was first published in German in 2014 and is the novelist’s third book.It was published by Scribe in Australia in 2020. I don't want to brag, but Popeye's got nothing on me now. It's not a full 5 stars because I do feel like the first half of the book has been much better, but that could be because of my personal interests (I've always had a weak spot for reading about WW2 experiences) and also because I just liked the characters better. A family saga that starts with the four daughters of a Georgian chocolatier, through wars and revolutions and generations. The Eighth Life (Nino Haratischvili, trans by Charlotte Collins and Ruth Martin, Scribe) has won the UK’s Warwick Prize for Women in Translation, reports the Bookseller. Even in real life, I often find myself being sad during social, and actually funny situations, because of my ever-present fear of it being ruined sooner or later anyway. Nino Haratischwili: Das achte Leben (The Eighth Life) Nino Haratischwili’s monumental novel (944 pages) can best be described as being threefold. That's the country of Georgia, which I knew almost nothing about. But this book has this really wondrous way of telling it. ‘The Eighth Life… is a lavish banquet of family stories that can, for all their sorrows, be devoured with gluttonous delight. There is a recurring theme of Stasia seeing the ghosts of dead people, and I thought this showed the magic of the book incredibly well. No matter what they say about our shortened attention spans, the days of the sweeping multigenerational epic are not over. Written in eight books as a family history to a young niece, the narrative follows each generation as they live through the Bolshevik revolution, Stalin’s purge and its accompanying gulags and torture, brutal assault, the Siege of Leningrad and the Prague spring. The novel recounts the tales of multiple generations of a family in the country of Georgia over the 20th century following them through the Russian Revolution, Soviet rule and civil war. This is an expansive family saga with a touch of magical realism in the form of a chocolate recipe handed down through generations bringing w. Follow the tale of Georgian Jashi family throughout the red century and into the 21st century. Second, this book is way too pretty to. Yet Kostya, the patriarch basking in nomenklatura privilege, is scathing about Georgian claims to victimhood: “What a comfortable life the Georgian elite – including the intelligentsia – had established for themselves in their little piece of paradise.” The less privileged Eristavi family fare worse as fall guys in the Gulag. Of her assault by a Mkhedrioni militiaman, Niza writes: “I remember everything, but I don’t remember what I felt through it all.” Such numbness also afflicts a country trapped in the repetitions of history. I owe them to you because you deserve the eighth life. • Follow Maya Jaggi on Twitter @MayaJaggi. You are. Update: I am so happy that it is included in the long-list of International Booker 2020. ‘The Eighth Life… is a lavish banquet of family stories that can, for all their sorrows, be devoured with gluttonous delight. Besides, where was all this wretched truth-telling heading?”, “En ik vind het leven veel te kort en veel te mooi om het niet echt in de ogen te zien, het niet echt aan te gaan, het niet echt te leven.”, International Booker Prize Nominee for Longlist (2020), Warwick Prize Nominee for Women in Translation (2020), International Booker Prize: Eligible Books 2020, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, review of The Eighth Life by Nino Haratischvili on LonesomeReader, The Eighth Life (For Brilka) by Nino Haratischwili -- 5 stars + ♥, 2020 International Booker Longlist: The Eighth Life, 33 Reader Approved, Highly Rated Fiction to Discover Now. 50 pages was all I needed to realize this was not for me: it reads like a textbook on 20th-century Georgian and Russian history with too many superficially-drawn characters interwoven—and awkwardly woven, to boot. I actually tried to decide on a favourite character yesterday while showering, and I couldn't pick one. The last days I often found myself at home, feeling really sad and empty. Yet these devices seem less convincing than the finely plotted correspondences and illuminating historical grasp. I love how the book always veers between both sides of the coin, keeping just the exactly right balance between both worlds, even quite literally: this books is as much about the living as it is about the dead. Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. I think this book was everything The Goldfinch was trying to be; without being so incredibly pretentious. We’d love your help. Books by Nino Haratischvili. It seems the book is doing a simple thing, but somehow it is managing to do it in a magical captivating way without resorting to any tricks. I don't think anyone has the slightest idea how terrible I've been feeling recently. There’s something so satisfying about getting immersed in a big family saga. At the start of the twentieth century, on the edge of the Russian Empire, a family prospers. It's not trying to sell more than it is, and it doesn't have to, because it already is enough! This is not a happy book. And it teaches you without it ever sounding lecturing; it just sounds very real. Scribe has published the English translation for the first time in Australia, and they were kind enough to send me a copy for review. ISBN-13: 9781950354146 Summary An epic family saga beginning with the Russian Revolution and swirling across a century, encompassing war, loss, love requited and unrequited, ghosts, joy, massacres, tragedy. ‘That night Stasia took an oath, swearing to learn the recipe by heart and destroy the paper. If it’s not my all-time favourite novel (and it might be) then it must be in the top three or four. But when another character asks Stasia if she's seeing the ghosts again, and Stasia answers that yes, and that someone has joined them, that was terrifyingly sad and beautiful. So interesting Adina...I thought Georgians were Central Asiatics as opposed to Eastern Europeans. At this point, the narrator, Niza, has been subjected to a life-changing (and grimly graphic) assault in the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, and the civil war that followed the Soviet Union’s collapse is about to multiply such atrocities into anonymous statistics. Read this book — its almost 1300 pages (German paperback) demand quite a lot of your reading muscle but much more from the book’s characters. This is my ALL TIME favorite book in the Historical Fiction genre, and I can't recommend this book enough!! Henry VIII was survived by three children, each of whom sat on the throne of England: Edward VI (ruled 1547–53), Mary I (ruled 1553–58), and Elizabeth I (ruled 1558–1603). I read this book in Polish and I've been waiting and waiting and waiting for this book to be translated in English so that I can share it with my English speaking friends. Joseph Stalin; Show more; Follow The Telegraph In its German edition, The Eighth Life was a bestseller, and won the Anna Seghers Prize, the Lessing Prize Stipend, and the Bertolt Brecht Prize 2018. So don't let the looks of it deter you from a wonderful reading experience. See how bad I am at advertising? It's also very huge in its size (as in height), which makes it very impractical to read. I'm talking about rape, about emotional abuse, about WW2, gulags and concentration camps. Eve. So I was in much doubt, and decided to start with this chunk of literature first, because at least I would have it behind me then. I cannot put into words how much I loved this book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Psychological acuity … Nino Haratischvili. I really have no words for how beautifully it is written and I doubt there are any that would do it justice. The Eighth Life, an ‘epic tale of six generations of one family’, was first published in German in 2014 and is the novelist’s third book. Niza Jashi, in her early 30s, is the fifth of six generations of the Jashi family, whose saga she writes down in Germany (where the Georgian-born Haratischvili lives) for her 12-year-old niece Brilka. A disappointment. The Eighth Life (for Brilka), originally published in German in 2014, has the heft and sweep to overturn such misconceptions, while introducing the uninitiated to a beguiling culture. Actually quite a contrived message, isn't it? I got a shitload of books for Christmas (I feel a bit overwhelmed tbh, but the best kind of overwhelmed, because let's face it - BOOKS) but I really was a bit Meh about this one. This book. I'm talking about pure horror on the in- and outside of the character's lives. Yet Alani’s ambiguous path explores culpability, atonement and redemption in a novel that is also about fate and free will. And that may sound weird, and very concerning, and maybe I've just really lost my mind: but I think that's amazing!!!! This biography of Henry VIII of England provides detailed information about his childhood, life, achievements, works & timeline [the country in the Caucasus region, not the U.S. state! by Scribe UK. And lives is exactly what the book is about: the lives of Stasia, Christine, Kostya, Kitty, Elene, Daria, Niza - and Brilka, who the narrator of the book (Niza) is talking to throughout the story. They feel so real! I don't think I have very small hands, but oh they did feel small while reading and I'm pretty sure I stretched them endlessly while trying to hold the book (will I know finally be able to hold dodgeballs properly? ***I just discovered that this book is finally being translated to English (long overdue in my opinion!!) I’ve adopted your heart. A red century. The Eighth Life (For Brilka) is discursive and rapid while also suggesting the melancholy grandeur of what Haratischvili calls the Red Century. Comparisons have been made to “War and Peace” and “The Tin Drum” but, from my own frame of reference, I'd liken it more to “Gone with the Wind” crossed with “One Hundred Years of Solitude”. The proof is in the pudding: The Eighth Life by Nino Haratischvili recounts a crucial period in history, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, through the lives of one exceptional family. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published It is being translated into many languages, and has already been a major bestseller on publication in Holland, Poland, and Georgia. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. THIS WAS SOOOOOOOOOO GOOD! From independent presses, to tales in translation, to critical darlings and new debut novels, these books (all published in the U.S. this year)... An international phenomenon: the unputdownable story of seven women living through the greatest drama of the twentieth century. Nino Haratischvili’s characters … come to exuberant life. That's how quoteable it is! The book blames a magical chocolate recipe for it; the only thing I thought a bit unnecessary, because it only served as a plot device for explaining why every character's happiness turned into shambles sooner or later. It's rather your empathy for the character that makes you suffer with them. It's simple and so poetic at the same time, but not poetic in a preposterous way, it's still extremely accessible! That rarely happens, usually when I read something I automatically maintain some sort of distance. It is a fate I don't want to put on any book, especially not such a gorgeous-looking one. In its German edition, The Eighth Life was a bestseller, and won the Anna Seghers Prize, the Lessing Prize Stipend, and the Bertolt Brecht Prize 2018. The ambitious, vivid and unflinching translation from the original German by Ruth Martin and Charlotte Collins is in itself a work of art, and deserves to win every translation prize going. It will easily make my Top 10 of the year and will be a book I rave about for years to come. I mean, how good can a book be if none (literally none!) It is being translated into many languages, and has already been a major bestseller on publication in Holland, Poland, and Georgia. The Eighth Life is an unforgettable love letter to Georgia and the Caucasus, to lives led and to come, and to writing itself.” ―The Economist “The Eighth Life…is a lavish banquet of family stories that can, for all their sorrows, be devoured with gluttonous delight. I feel like my left arm is really muscular at this point. Refresh and try again. Round about page 930, I started chanting “nonononononononono.” Silver linings are few and far between in this epic Georgian family saga. At over 930 pages, “The Eighth Life” may look intimidating from the outside and I had a few false starts reading this novel but as soon as I got caught up in the many stories it contains I stopped noticing what page number I was on. I can honestly say that 930 pages is STILL NOT ENOUGH. There are echoes down the generations, from the thwarted dreams of dancers and poets to devastated loves, and passion between women. A caution wh A century connects us. But as I close the book and think back as the last line is read, I can only say it is finished and I, as the reader, feel like that precious eighth life. OKAY SO. The writing style is absolutely beautiful, I think this is the most magical writing style I've read in a couple of years. and I am besides excited!!! This book has had my complete attention every spare minute of the last week, and I was absorbed from page 1 to page 944. The novel recounts the tales of multiple generations of a family in the country of Georgia over the 20th century following them through the Russian Revolution, Soviet rule and civil war. In its German edition, The Eighth Life was a bestseller, and won the Anna Seghers Prize, the Lessing Prize Stipend, and the Bertolt Brecht Prize 2018. It is being translated into many languages, and has already been a major bestseller on publication in Holland, Poland, and Georgia. -- Catherine Taylor * The Economist * 'An epic read that will leave you 100% satisfied.' In its German edition, The Eighth Lifewas a bestseller, and won the Anna Seghers Prize, the Lessing Prize Stipend, and the Bertolt Brecht Prize 2018. Kostya’s wayward daughter Elene is mother to Niza and her half-sister Daria. I enjoyed reading it in a light way but am somewhat bemused at what it's doing on the International Booker list: it's entertaining, nicely written, fluently translated - but I wouldn't classify it as 'literary' in that it's not doing anything novel, isn't delivering any new historical or personal insights, doesn't press on the boundaries of genre or language - it's entertaining, it's unchallenging, it's an ideal holiday/bathtub/long flight read. This is an amiable crowd-pleaser of a novel: a 'sweeping' family saga through the twentieth century history of what purports to be Georgia but which is essentially Soviet Russia. The 8th century is the period from 701 to 800 in accordance with the Julian Calendar.The coast of North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula quickly came under Islamic Arab domination. This is the wonderful English translation by Charlotte Collins and Ruth Martin. Certainly not) Yes, it's thick and I know that this is very off-putting - I mean no one wants to run around with a book that could easily knock out a person were you to hit them with it (not that I would, but it's a perfect weapon against all possible murderers and rapists! This is actually what I enjoyed most about the book, you get to take away so much from it! But it was so worth it! Yes, it is! This is my ALL TIME favorite book in the Historical Fiction genre, and I can't recommend this book enough!! Having checked quite a few mediocre reviews, all of them complaining about the lack of character development, I decided to jump early. For ever and eight. Her huge novel … shows a double face, its crushing pain and loss nonetheless conveyed … The Red Army invasion that curtails Georgia’s first republic of 1918-21 finds a brutal echo in Tbilisi on 9 April 1989, when Soviet troops bludgeon peaceful demonstrators to death with shovels. Life on the fringes of the Russian and Soviet empires is vividly evoked in this award-winning family saga from Georgia, Last modified on Thu 5 Dec 2019 07.57 EST. It reminds me a bit of. Niza’s carnivalesque “carpet” is knotted together with the aid of such literary conventions as a family recipe for hot chocolate as accursed as it is addictive, and a grandmother visited by spirits. From Tbilisi and Moscow to London and Berlin, their lives are vividly enmeshed with world events, from the rise and fall of the Soviet empire to the siege of Leningrad and the Prague spring. In fact, the book can be considered as an elementary introduction to Georgian and Russian history interwoven with some convenient family history. To see what your friends thought of this book. First of all, I've never heard of this book, which, given the amount of time I spend (waste) on this website, is pretty crucial! Start by marking “The Eighth Life” as Want to Read: Error rating book. Read "The Eighth Life (for Brilka) The International Bestseller" by Nino Haratischvili available from Rakuten Kobo. On paper, it's horribly hard to describe why I would recommend the book to everyone. I KNOW. Author: Nino Haratischvili Title: The Eighth Life (for Brilka) It's not like we didn't know that already. This is so much better, because you do not only get to know the characters and feel with and for them, you also learn so much about what life was back then. He reported on Russia as a journalist in the 1990s for the Times and the Moscow Times, twice worked for the BBC World Service and has written on Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan for more than 20 years. When I was artistic director of the UK’s first festival of Georgian writers, I realised how Georgia’s complex history is often wrongly conflated with Russia’s – despite having its own language and alphabet. The Eighth Life is published by Scribe at £20.
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